Category Archives: ARC552 – Studio

Studio15 : DeCoding the City – Reclaiming Spatial Production

Module: ARC552

Tutor: Sam Vardy, University of Sheffield

Description:

Studio 15 aims to explore the notion of urban Codes to develop proposals of spatial production. By spatial we mean the creation of new spaces, new activities and new constructions in cities, but also new practices, new social and political relationships, new networks and new identities. the work produced by the studio will critically question the current hyper-regulation of space and the production of architecture and urbanism, and search for tactics to reclaim the ‘right to the city’. This will be thought of from both the point of view of the ‘citizen’, their right to intervene and to make, and to occupy space, and the point of view of architecture, by questioning its role in the contemporary urban situation.

Deadlines:

Thu 02/12/2010 and Fri 03/12/2010 – Studio cross-reviews
– Mon 17/01/2011 – ‘Summary’ Drawing / ‘Project Agenda (Attitude)’ Drawing

Social Assemblage / Spatial Assemblage

I’ve been using simples diagrams to explore and define the spatial and social assemblage in my project – this should help me make some decisions about exactly how people use various spaces and for what reasons, which will help me interrogate the plans I produced earlier.

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Plans from models….

As part of my ongoing process to develop my studio design project – tentatively titled the Academy of Added Value – I have begun a process through which I first give from through models, then draw a plan of the model, before critiquing and rationalising the plan and returning to models or exploring through section. I will also be exploring relationships between spaces diagrammatically as part of this process. These plans immediately need alteration – I feel that the scheme is too large overall, and that the architecture of the various programmatic elements (mentor units / CHP plant / canteen / reception (’embassy’) on the ground floor, and library / ‘silent’ space / roof garden / link to existing building of first floor) needs to link together better. However, its been good to get a ‘first iteration’ out, tangible, in order for it to be critiqued. I treat this plan as a point of departure.

The models to which these plans relate can be found in a previous post .

Ground Floor Plan – 1:100 @A2 – (PDF – First Draft – GF – 1-100 – A2)

First Floor Plan – 1:100 @A2 – (PDF – First Draft – FF – 1-100 – A2)

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A Pattern Language…

This extract here, from the book ‘A Pattern Language’ by Christopher Alexander, is particularly useful for my studio project…

No one enjoys his work if he is a cog in a machine.

Therefore:

Encourage the formation of self-governing workshops and offices of 5 to 20 workers. Make each group autonomous – with respect to organization, style, relation to other groups, hiring and firing, work schedule. Where the work is complicated and requires larger organizations, several of these work groups can federate and cooperate to produce complex artifacts and services.

 

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Model-making…

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Wick Curiosity Shop…and site visits.

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Just returned from London having spent three days in and around Hackney Wick, conducting site research and analysis and taking part in events run by the Wick Curiosity Shop. more to follow…

 

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Roof Plans….so much better than figure-ground!

I am currently – and laboriously – Illustrator-ing a figure-ground map of Hackney Wick for Design Review Panel next Wednesday. All I can keep thinking is that a roof plan, although taking longer, actually shows everything the figure-ground does (massing, grain…) and more, like character of buildings (for example, terraces show up on figure-ground, but a roof plan shows that they actually have a common hipped roof, rather than individual double-pitches. This kind of information becomes relevant at later stages, and also helps to ‘flavour’ the area being investigated.

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Happenings in Hackney – Horrible and Happy

1/ Gensler’s ski-centre (Snow In The City), to replace the media centre for the Olympic Park in Legacy Mode…..is it really legacy if your adding it afterwards? Other phrases that spring to mind are ‘zaha’ and ‘wannabe’……..HORRIBLE!


2/ GHM Rock Townsend have received planning permission for this building right opposite my proposed site in Hackney Wick…having previously been criticised for being ‘of poor design quality’ and ‘too tall’.

I would maintain that these criticisms are still valid of the revised scheme. The area – particularly the building shown to the left in this image – is rich in existing vitality (particularly of the light manufacturing type proposed by sportswear manufacturer Pentland, who are the client for this building), and it seems far too intrusive an insertion to be appropriate for its site.

Even last minute concessions to change metal cladding to ‘local vernacular’ brick do little to help the building settle in to its site. From our experience of researching this area, it seems that although there is a history of architectural resilience in the area, there is also a tradition of humble, user-initiated intervention. This feels far too brash and new to be where it is. What happened to the idea of re-instating the pub?

A BD Article can be found hereHORRIBLE!

 

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Studio – The Make/Do Yard – First Review and Follow Up Tutorial…

Please find below the drawings I presented at Review last week. At the end of the post is a statement of intent for the next few weeks of the project…

The project is for a Yard (as both an architecture and a collective noun for a co-operative group of people), in Hackney Wick, east London. The site is Queen’s Yard, immediately adjacent to the Lea Navigation’s Hackney Cut which borders the future 2012 Olympic Park.

Originally conceived as a critique of legacy in the Olympic development, the Yard provides a point of expression for the vital communities active in Hackney Wick – artists and other alternative culture groups, craftsmen, breakers and community gardeners – who are familiar with a culture of transformation, re-use, and making the most of what they have. It considers education and learning as a personal reading of transformation and regeneration, and proposes that an interpretation of the Yard as a school (based around the core activities of making things) offers the opportunity to sustain this vital culture through the pressure of vast, imposed ‘regeneration’.

The collages below explore key themes in my project. The first demonstrates a technique, derived from Pete Sabara’s ‘Healthy Section’, that simply sets up ‘aspirational’ programmatic themes, in a basic spatial relation, so that they can be discussed and then refined. Therefore, my Transformational Section includes 5 core elements; The Embassy; The School; The Yard; The Spa; and The Mint…

The montage below represents The Yard,as an architectural idea. The process of montage using laser printed photographs, pencils and inks  is engaged – its get me away from the computer and out into the air – which underpins my thinking for this project. This particular drawing explores and illustrates the idea that what you don’t draw is sometimes as telling as what you do. The flexible, affording qualities of a Yard for interaction between tenants – for ‘soft space’ and indeterminacy – are simply not physically ‘designed’ in the normal way. The buildings around the yard are interfaces and the unbuilt space between them shares equal architectural importance.

The School montage explores basic spatiality of ‘learning’ in specific relation to act of making. ‘Classroom’ spaces might be disparate and dispersed, yet unified architecturally, sharing a similar typology of relation to the active Yard. A condition of tenancy of the Yard might be support of the teaching operation in its education activities – by which mechanism the school underpins –  is underpinned by – the community in which it is based. It usefully sets up a discussion about modes of education, their plurality, and the consciousness of those engaged in the process. Is teaching  delivered? Or do we learn together? Should we be conscious of our engagement with a defined process of learning? Or is it an aside? Concepts of asymmetric learning (whereby differences in current states of knowledge are acknowledged) and ‘nurture’ are afforded by a reinterpretation of learning environments, specifically considered

The Mint considers the role of finance and exchange in underpinning a productive economy and how the typology of institute emerges from the genesis of currency. We have become divorced from a physical relation to that which measures production and by derivation experience a reduced frequency of face-to-face encounters accompanying the contract of exchange; the same encounters that build relationships and strengthen communities. An aspect of my project will explore mechanisms by which these encounters can be instigated and perpetuated. Following the review, we discussed how the term ‘Mint’ might be restrictive in relation to the intent described above – perhaps exchange is better facilitated by the typology of market? The concept should be redefined in terms specific to this project, but remain as a catalyst for thought. How can economics catalyze the vitality and educative processes happening in the Yard?

The collage on Embassy explored the idea of a  functionary that regulates encounter with the Yard. Upon dissection, the term Embassy actually refers to a group of people – the Ambassador and his entourage – rather than to a building typology, which is in fact termed the Chancery. It is interesting to note that a Chancery is also the term given to the office where monks of certain religious orders engage with writing and record keeping. Therefore, the Embassy perhaps has a role in the Yard as the point of reference for those wishing to interface with it, and as a literal facilitator of the exchange of knowledge. If termed more appropriately as Consulate, this agency represents a valve through which the flow of resources is regulated (an Embassy both issues visas to incoming aliens and passports to outgoing nationals). Architecturally, the Consulate may need accommodating and the requirements of this will be explored further as the tenancy of the Yard evolves.

The Spa was introduced initially as literal programme with the intent of exploiting the historic tradition of social, public bathing in the Borough of Hackney, the aquatic amenity of the Lea Valley and the surplus hot water produced in Combined Cooling, Heat and Power (CCHP) generation at the Olympic Energy Center sited just across the canal from Queen’s Yard.

However, the Spa has actually come to allude to a less literal role in the experience of learning – the importance of reflection and juxtaposition. It also refers to the importance of casual exchange in ‘piecing things together’ and even to trust implicit in contractual agreements. There is the idea that in other places, different activities take place in Spas – most notably, Swedish business deals are sometimes made in the sauna when, being naked, you have nothing to hide. Restoration, regeneration, personal ‘growth’ through transformation, re-learning the link between mind and body, perception and embodiment – all are alluded to by the Spa as a programmatic element.

Thus the Spa has come to represent the idea of a ‘change of state’. Simply being somewhere else affords different perspectives which through juxtaposition reveal aspects of self and ones own situation. Thus the literal programme of Spa may remain, all be it on a smaller scale and by a different name to that which it began. I simply want to explore the way embodied juxtaposition and difference can support social interaction in an environment conducive to learning through doing. Again, the term ‘Spa’ is perhaps restrictive and should be redefined in terms appropriate to this project.

Considering British Waterways as a tenant gives me an opportunity to introduce an aquatic element to the programme. Through revitalization of the waterways, and under its remit to diversify their use British Waterways’ network of volunteers could use the section of canal bordering Queens Yard to demonstrate work that returns it to a state fit for bathing.

Elements of this project are appropriate to explore through case studies of precedent assemblages and organisations. Below is the example shown previously for Portland Works in Sheffield. In these studies I am interested in exploring a drawing style that communicates the complexity of spatial, social and material assemblages that underpin the condition of the Yard.

The previously explored precedent of the Steel Yard in Rhode Island, US is re-worked in this drawing style to illustrate the particular assemblages comprising that condition.

The assemblage technique is then applied – in several stages and different scales – to Queen’s Yard at Hackney Wick, to pull out existing tenant offering potential to the project.

 

Next Steps….

3 specific scenarios, based on existing tenants, that re-imagine their condition as learning situations. Drawings will add a different layer to the montage drawing method, developing the methodology through which I am exploring my project.

Personal Manifesto, exploring and stating what I would like to get out of the rest of 5th year.

Assemblages, to set up a discussion of the spatial, social and material conditions of my project as they evolve, considering them as interdependent networks.

Basic context drawings (figure ground / site plan / location / etc.) for the upcoming Design Review in Leeds (Wednesday 22nd February)

 

Methodology

I am pleased with the methodology that I am developing for this project – of fundamental importance is the fact that it gets me away from the computer and makes me engage with physical material and process. I believe this supports the very ideas I am trying to explore with this project.

The collages presented in this post represent the first chapter of programmatic exploration. The next chapter will be an evolution of the same technique, adding a layer of specificity by appropriating real, physical spaces that can be represented in the drawings.

The technique lends itself to the duality of complexity and simplicity that is a condition of the Yard. Very specific determinacy of tenancy and activity is complimented by the indeterminacy of the spaces between buildings. Both are important.

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GHM Rock Townsend Building – Hackney Wick

GHM Rock Townsend have received planning permission for this building right opposite my proposed site in Hackney Wick…having previously been criticised for being ‘of poor design quality’ and ‘too tall’.

I would maintain that these criticisms are still valid of the revised scheme. The area – particularly the building shown to the left in this image – is rich in existing vitality (particularly of the light manufacturing type proposed by sportswear manufacturer Pentland, who are the client for this building), and it seems far too intrusive an insertion to be appropriate for its site.

Even last minute concessions to change metal cladding to ‘local vernacular’ brick do little to help the building settle in to its site. From our experience of researching this area, it seems that although there is a history of architectural resilience in the area, there is also a tradition of humble, user-initiated intervention. This feels far too brash and new to be where it is. What happened to the idea of re-instating the pub?

A BD Article can be found here

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New Economics…

New Economics recognises that a neighbourhood’s non-monetary assets – its diversity, history, distinctiveness, neighbourliness, know-how, enthusiasm – are as important as money to its economic success. The way that money flows around the economy, and whether it stays circulating or flows away, is as important as the total amount of money.

Diverse ecosystems are more resilient to shocks in just the same way as diverse local economies…

David Boyle & Andrew Simms – New Economics, P.173

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